Deciding whether to fret your cigar box guitar

The questions come up often among Cigar Box Guitar builders: Is fretting worth it? Why would I want to fret my build? What do I need to know and what tools do I need to get started? Fretting can be a complex topic, but it doesn’t need to be a murky mystery to builders.

C. B. Gitty's Fretting GuideThe questions come up often among Cigar Box Guitar builders: Is fretting worth it? Why would I want to fret my build? What do I need to know and what tools do I need to get started? Fretting can be a complex topic, but it doesn’t need to be a murky mystery to builders. This article will attempt to cover some of the basic concepts to help you decide whether you are ready to take the plunge, as well as point you to other resources to help you get started.

One of the best resources you can find to help you get started fretting is our C. B. Gitty’s Fretting Guide, a 39-page electronic book packed with photos and great do-it-yourself how-to information Continue reading “Deciding whether to fret your cigar box guitar”

Diatonic (Dulcimer-Style) Fretting – What it is, How and Why to Use It

61-013-02 Image 4Most folks are familiar, at least by sight, with the six-string guitar – whether an acoustic guitar like a Martin or an electric guitar like a Fender Stratocaster™. So it is natural that when people think of frets, or a fretboard, they think of a guitar fretboard – an evenly distributed collection of frets that get closer together the further you go up the neck towards the guitar body.

First, let’s start with what Diatonic (Dulcimer) fretting is NOT…

On a standard guitar, like the Fender Strat mentioned above, or the cigar box guitar in the photo below, it is said to be fretted on a chromatic scale. We are not going to get into the theory behind what that means here, but just take away this tidbit: a chromatic scale, like on a standard guitar, allows you to play every note you could possibly need for a song. All of the sharps, “natural” notes and flats. It’s all in there, and if you aren’t sure of what you are doing it is pretty easy to hit a sharp or a flat when you don’t mean to, causing potentially jarring discordance. Continue reading “Diatonic (Dulcimer-Style) Fretting – What it is, How and Why to Use It”

Fretted vs. Fretless Cigar Box Guitars by Shane Speal

Shane Speal Slide GuitarA fan recently asked me:

Hey Shane, is it better to learn on a fretted or slide cigar box guitar?

Turns out, that’s a great question!  When I built my first cigar box guitar over 20 years ago, it had no frets, no fret markers and was played 100% with a slide.  For me, that was the perfect instrument because I wanted to play the deepest Delta blues possible.  I wanted the music to be primitive, creaky and have that slight out-of-tune sound of old Smithsonian recordings.

If you’re looking to capture the really old timey sound of a traditional cigar box guitar, then I suggest you shove a slide on your finger and grind away without frets.  There’s nothing like the whining moan of metal against metal going up the neck.

But wait!!!  There’s also magic happening with the modern Cigar Box Guitar Revolution where people are bucking tradition and utilizing these homemade instruments for something new.  They’re taking the concept of a homemade instrument and mixing it with new sounds they have in their heads.

If you’re not looking for the old time creaky stuff, then a fretted cigar box guitar may be the right tool for you.  Even a simple 3-string fretted cigar box guitar will allow you to play rock power chords, dulcimer-style passages and whatever your fertile brain can imagine.

The lesson here is to simply think about what you want to accomplish and then choose the right tool for the job.  The cigar box guitar is an instrument borne from American poverty back in the days even before The Great The Depression.  The builders and players simply were searching for a sound they couldn’t afford to purchase, so they made their own.  Be like them.  Follow the sound.

I have been working with C. B. Gitty Crafter Supply in creating a library of free cigar box guitar lessons.  Although we are still in the early stages of this project, you can still get a wealth of lessons at their sister site, CigarBoxGuitar.com.  In addition, I have posted my easy-to-follow video series at ShaneSpeal.com.

BTW, when I perform, half of my instruments are fretless and half are fretted.  Since my music encompasses a wide range of mutant styles, I need many guitars to perform a 3 hour bar gig.

Speaking of mutant styles, here’s a freakish video I filmed last night as I was practicing sitar sounds with a 3-string cigar box guitar.


If you just can’t decide between fretted or fretless, then heck with it – build (or buy) one of each! There is no rule that says you can only learn one, and having both styles in your trick bag will only help you become a better player.

– Shane

P. S. For a nice primer on what it takes to fret your own build, check out this article here on CigarBoxGuitar.com: Deciding Whether to Fret Your Cigar Box Guitar

 

 

 

 

Video: How To Install Fret Markers on your Cigar Box Guitar Fretboard

In this video how-to, Glenn Watt walks you through a great way to add fret position markers your cigar box guitar fretboard using wooden dowels. While a lot of folks are happy with just using a Sharpie or woodburning fret marks into their fretboard, using inset fret markers looks really good and definitely can give a build a more professional look. If you’ve consider it but thought it too hard or too much effort, think again! Glenn shows you just how quickly you can add this great feature to your next build.

Zero Frets – How and Why to Use Them on Cigar Box Guitars

Zero frets are an awesome addition to any cigar box guitar or other homemade/handmade instrument builder’s toolbag. In this how-to article, C. B. Gitty walks you though zero frets on cigar box guitars: what a zero fret is, why you’d want to use one, and how to go about installing your first one.

This photo shows a fretted cigar box guitar with a zero fret installed. We'll be showing you how (and why) to do this in this article.
This photo shows a fretted cigar box guitar with a zero fret installed. We’ll be showing you how (and why) to do this in this article.

The Zero Fret is an arcane subject to many cigar box guitar builders. I have to confess, for a long time they were a mystery to me too. Sure I had heard of them, seen pictures of people using them, and thought I understood most of the concept – but for some reason, I still always shied away from using one. That is, until Shane Speal finally beat it through my stubborn skull that we needed to start using them in the C. B. Gitty shop, and once we tried it we didn’t look back.

So this article is my effort to help everyone realize the benefits of using a zero fret setup on their cigar box guitar builds. It may not be for everyone, but my hope is that you’ll consider giving it a try. I’ll break this article down into three clear sections: What is a Zero Fret; Why to Use a Zero Fret; and How to Install a Zero Fret.

What is a Zero Fret?

Most simply stated, a zero fret is an extra piece of fretwire, usually a couple of sizes bigger than what you’re using on the rest of the fretboard, which gets installed up at the top of the fretboard where the nut would usually go. 

In our workshop, we usually use either our Medium/Medium nickel-silver fretwire or our Medium/High nickel-silver fretwire on the instruments we build. So for our zero frets, we will use a larger fretwire, most often our standard Jumbo nickel-silver. The jumbo wire’s crown is about 0.014″ higher than the Medium/Medium, and 0.012″ higher than the Medium/High, and we feel that this helps make sure that the action height work better and minimize buzzing in the strings. Other builders use the same size fret wire for the zero fret as they do for the rest of the frets. Check out the photo below.

Zero fret on a cigar box guitar diagram
This photo shows the zero fret, and first fret on a fretted cigar box guitar neck. Note the height difference between the zero and first frets, and also note the gap between the string and the first fret.

In the photo you can clearly see that the zero fret is a larger profile than the first fret (jumbo vs. medium), and you can also see the effect – a pronounced gap between the strings and the first fret. This gap is what is technically  referred to as the “action” or “action height” of the guitar, and keeping it as low as possible is very important to having a well-made and easy-to-play cigar box guitar. As mentioned above, some builders prefer to use the same size of fret wire for the zero fret as they  do on the rest of the fretboard – it’s not what we do, but there’s no question that it can work just as well. We advise trying both and seeing what works for you!

The other things you can see in the above photo are small screws that are used as string retainers, to make sure the strings stay in the right places , and at a good angle, as they cross over the zero fret. More on this below.

Why Use a Zero Fret?

As mentioned above, to build a fretted cigar box guitar that a professional musician will want to play, you have to pay very close attention to the “action height” – that is, the height of the strings off of the frets. You want it to be as low as possible, but not so low that you get buzzing or rattling from the strings when played.

This photo shows an example of a standard bone nut in use on a four-string cigar box guitar.
This photo shows an example of a standard bone nut in use on a four-string cigar box guitar.

Traditionally, the job of determining the action height on a guitar is done by the nut. Most often on store-bought guitars, nuts are made from bone, but they can also be made from plastic, wood, metal or synthetic materials like Corian.

The nut is glued into place at the top of the fretboard, and filed/sanded down to the right height, and then grooves for the strings are filed in to help keep the strings in the right position. As such, the nut both sets the action height (the height of the strings off the frets), as well as setting the spacing and position of the strings across the fretboard.

The problem with a nut is that it takes some skill and finesse to get them shaped just right, and at the right height, and with the string grooves just so. Of course if you file it too far down, there’s no going back – you have to remove it and start over with a new one. It is just way too easy to end up with an instrument with high action, which is not very fun to play and may even intonate badly, when using nuts.

Enter the Zero Fret – when you use a zero fret, you are pretty much guaranteed that your action height will be pretty much perfect. A good rule of thumb concerning action height on a guitar is that the gap between the strings and the first fret should be about 0.80mm – which just happens to be the thickness of a standard medium guitar pick. If you use jumbo or even one of the higher-profile medium gauges as your zero fret, and one of the standard medium-height fret wires (around 0.040″ to 0.045″ crown height) as the rest of your frets, you will definitely be in this ballpark.

Here is another angle of a zero fret installed on a cigar box guitar. This particular guitar featured an angled headstock, so the retainer screws are just holding the strings in the correct position, not holding them down to increase break angle.
Here is another angle of a zero fret installed on a cigar box guitar. This particular guitar featured an angled headstock, so the retainer screws are just holding the strings in the correct position, not holding them down to increase break angle.

One caveat with a zero fret is that you do need to install some hardware to help keep the strings in place. Depending on your headstock design (angled verses recessed) this hardware might also need to serve the task of holding the strings down, so that they will have some “break angle” as they go up and over the zero fret. See the photo below for a visual of what break angle is.

There are various styles of string retainers that can be used for this, but on C. B. Gitty cigar box guitars we usually use small round-headed screws for this purpose (as shown in the photos above and to the right).

How to Install Your First Zero Fret

Assuming that you have read everything above, there shouldn’t be too much mystery left as to how you should go about installing your first zero fret on a cigar box guitar. Here is the outline of steps to follow:

  • Get yourself some larger fret wire, such as our Jumbo profile.
  • When cutting your fret slots, cut a slot exactly on the nut line (usually you wouldn’t cut this, when using a nut). The slot can be sawn with the same saw as the rest of them.
  • Install one piece of the larger fret wire  in the slot you cut at the nut line, and use the smaller fretwire for the rest of the frets.
  • Smooth and dress the frets as you usually would, including the larger zero fret.
  • When you get to the point of stringing your guitar, figure out where your strings will go, and where your string retainers/retaining screws should be placed. See the photos above for an idea of where we place them on a 3-string guitar. Remember that you want the retainer to both hold the string in the correct position in relation to the neck, as well as (if necessary) help hold the string down a bit so that it has to angle back up to cross the zero fret.
  • The photo below helps show how retaining screws can be used on a cigar box guitar that has a recessed (instead of angled) headstock. The screws actually pull the strings downward from where they come off the tuner posts, so that they approach the nut (or zero fret) at a sharper angle. This photo happens to show an unfretted guitar with a threaded rod nut, but the principle is the same when using a zero fret. This sharper angle helps the guitar sound and intonate better (too low of an angle and the strings might buzz or vibrate).
This photo shows how retaining screws can be used to adjust the "break angle" of the strings - the angle at which they cross over the nut/zero fret. While this photo shows an unfretted cigar box guitar that uses a threaded rod nut, the same concept applies to a guitar using a zero fret.
This photo shows how retaining screws can be used to adjust the “break angle” of the strings – the angle at which they cross over the nut/zero fret. While this photo shows an unfretted cigar box guitar that uses a threaded rod nut, the same concept applies to a guitar using a zero fret.

 

You should now be able to string and tune your guitar, and your zero fret should be giving you pretty much optimal action height. The added step of having to use string retainers is a small price to pay compared to the hassle of installing and filing down a nut and getting it just right.

Zero frets, properly used, guarantee good string action height every time, and at least in the C. B. Gitty shops we have switched over to them for pretty much all of our Farmington Road Instrument Works cigar box guitars.

I hope that this article helps you better understand what a zero fret is, why you’d want to use them, and how to go about doing so. Please feel free to post comments or send questions, so that I can revise, expand and add to this article!